2021 Wyndham Championship Odds Preview

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2021 Wyndham Championship- Betting Odds Preview

Setting the scene

The Wyndham Championship, hosted at Sedgefield Country Club, will be the final tournament of the PGA Tour regular season. Those who do not finish in the top 125 in the FedEx Cup standings at the end of this week will be eliminated from playoff contention, meaning they will not compete for the FedEx Cup title and $15 million prize. Only five of the top-25 players in the world are competing, as the majority of the big names have opted to rest ahead of the playoffs. At this relatively simple course, making many birdies is crucial for success, with the last five champions shooting 21 or 22 under par on route to victory.

The headline acts — Matsuyama, Patrick Reed, Louis Oosthuizen, and Webb Simpson, the latter of whom has a remarkable record at this layout – are four major winners. Former Wyndham champions Si Woo Kim, Brandt Snedeker, and defending champion Jim Herman are also in town, along with Sungjae Im, Brian Harman, and rookie Will Zalatoris.

Observing folks in and around the 125 bubble will probably be the most entertaining. This week, Matt Kuchar (120), Adam Scott (123), and Rickie Fowler (125) will all be keeping a close eye on the leaderboard. At the same time, Tommy Fleetwood, Justin Rose, and Olympic silver medalist Rory Sabatini will have to work hard to qualify for the Northern Trust.

Betting Angles

Tee anyone?


Starting with Davis Love III in 2015, the last six winners have ranked 32nd, 51st, 71st, 25th, 51st, and 51st for Driving Distance. This is not a bomber’s course; instead, it is a course for the precise. Other than Snedeker, the first and second J.T Poston, and course-specialist, Webb Simpson ranked second and first for DA in 2019, and 16th (Patrick Reed) is the poorest any winner has rated for Driving Accuracy in the 13 renewals since the event returned to Sedgefield.

Fore!


The number one rated player on the par fours had finished first or second in each of the first seven renewals at Sedgefield. That trend continued following the 2017 renewal, with Henrik Stenson placing second for Par 4 Scoring, behind the runner-up, Ollie Schniederjans. Stenson had a combined score of -10 on the par fours, while Schniederjans had a score of -15.

Snedeker won in 2018 despite being ranked 12th for Par 4 Scoring, but we returned to the norm in 2019 when Poston played them in 14-under-par, with Byeong Hun An and Viktor Hovland tying for second after playing them in -12. Last year, Herman and Horschel, who finished second, played them in 11-under-par.

Course correlation


From a course correlation standpoint, form at Donald Ross-designed courses tends to cross over well, so take a look at the form at Oak Hill Country Club, which hosted the 2013 USPGA Championship, won by Jason Dufner, and for more recent form, look at the Rocket Mortgage Classic at Detroit Golf Club, Aronimink Country Club, which hosted the AT & T National in both 2010 and 2011, and the BMW Championship.

Oddly enough, there is a first time for everything


Poston got off the mark here two years ago, and six of the last 12 victors were breaking their ducks on the PGA Tour. Last year, Herman hit 1000.0, and outsiders have been doing exceptionally well lately. Poston was very unfancied in 2019, having been matched at a high of 290.0 before the event, and the four winners before Henrik had all been matched at a triple-figure price before the start.

Patrick Reed won his first PGA Tour title here in 2013; after being matched at 100.0, Camilo Villegas was a 150.0 shot in 2014, and the first three players to finish in 2015 all went off at considerable prices. Davis Love III, Jason Gore, and Scott Brown, who tied for third, all went off with odds of 1000.0, 440.0, and 320.0, respectively, while Si Woo Kim, the 2016 winner, was matched at 220.0 before the start.

Golden oldies


With distance off the tee no longer a factor, this is a place where the seniors can flourish. As previously stated, Snead is the oldest PGA Tour winner, and Love became the third oldest to win on the PGA Tour when he won here in 2015. Last year, Herman was 42 years old when he won the prize.

Horses for courses

Since 2008, the Wyndham has been held at Sedgefield, another striking Donald Ross design. But, again, the golfers’ accuracy and ability to regularly hit greens in regulation will be tested by the smaller than typical Bermuda grass greens. This parkland course isn’t the longest on tour, but it will undoubtedly favor accurate players who shoot low scores, with winning scores recently averaging around 20-under-par.

Years of neglect, as with many Donald Ross golf courses, deteriorated the course’s quality. Pure Donald Ross golf courses have tricky greens and green surrounds, which deteriorate in quality and difficulty over time if not properly maintained. Kris Spence rebuilt the golf course to its original roots in 2007, as well as lengthening it to accommodate the increased length of PGA Tour players. That was enough to persuade the PGA Tour to bring the Greater Greensboro Open back to Sedgefield, where it has since been held.

The golf course’s routing is also excellent. Golfers tee off in entirely different directions than they did the previous hole. Because of the shifting wind direction and the sloping of the land from hole to hole, this adds to the difficulty. Despite these difficulties, the golf course is reasonably easy for professionals.

Where’s the money?

Let’s now look at the betting for the week ahead:

Webb Simpson 12-1
Hideki Matsuyama 14-1
Louis Oosthuizen 18-1
Patrick Reed 22-1
Brian Harman 28-1
Will Zalatoris 28-1
Jason Kokrak 28-1
Sungjae Im 30-1
Kevin Kisner 33-1
Tommy Fleetwood 33-1
Charl Schwartzel 33-1
Russell Henley 35-1
Matthew Wolff 40-1
Kevin Streelman 40-1
Seamus Power 40-1
Kevin Na 40-1
Si-Woo Kim 40-1
Gary Woodland 40-1
Bubba Watson 40-1
Adam Scott 40-1
Rickie Fowler 45-1
Justin Rose 45-1
Robert Macintyre 45-1
Brandt Snedeker 45-1
Sebastian Munoz 50-1
Branden Grace 50-1
Jhonattan Vegas 50-1
J.T. Poston 50-1
Erik Van Rooyen 50-1
Mito Pereira 50-1
Zach Johnson 55-1
Talor Gooch 55-1
Ryan Moore 60-1
Harold Varner 60-1
Patton Kizzire 66-1
Lucas Glover 66-1
Chez Reavie 66-1
Doug Ghim 66-1
Hank Lebioda 66-1
MacKenzie Hughes 70-1
Ryan Armour 80-1
Luke List 80-1
Doc Redman 80-1
Brendon Todd 80-1
Chris Kirk 80-1
Lanto Griffin 80-1
Rory Sabbatini 80-1
Adam Schenk 80-1
C.T. Pan 80-1
Joel Dahmen 80-1
Keith Mitchell 100-1
Patrick Rodgers 100-1
Kramer Hickok 100-1
Kyle Stanley 100-1
Adam Hadwin 100-1
Matt Jones 100-1
Jim Herman 100-1
Mark Hubbard 100-1
Dylan Frittelli 100-1
Andrew Putnam 100-1
Bo Hoag 100-1
Roger Sloan 100-1
Scott Piercy 100-1
Francesco Molinari 100-1
Tom Lewis 100-1
Brandon Hagy 100-1
Henrik Norlander 125-1
Adam Long 125-1
Scott Stallings 125-1
Matt Kuchar 125-1
Kyoung-Hoon Lee 125-1
Michael Thompson 125-1
Sepp Straka 125-1
Brian Stuard 125-1
Aaron Wise 125-1
Sam Ryder 150-1
Byeong Hun An 150-1
Brice Garnett 150-1
Richy Werenski 150-1
Martin Laird 150-1
Joseph Bramlett 150-1
Jason Dufner 200-1
Camilo Villegas 200-1
Matthew NeSmith 200-1
Nick Taylor 200-1
Wyndham Clark 200-1
Vincent Whaley 200-1
James Hahn 200-1
Russell Knox 200-1
Beau Hossler 200-1
Anirban Lahiri 200-1
Satoshi Kodaira 200-1
Harry Higgs 250-1
Denny McCarthy 250-1
Nate Lashley 250-1
Will Gordon 250-1
Tom Hoge 250-1
Sean O’Hair 250-1
Chesson Hadley 250-1
Bo Van Pelt 250-1
Akshay Bhatia 250-1
Kevin Tway 250-1
Scott Brown 250-1
Chase Seiffert 300-1
Kiradech Aphibarnrat 300-1
Davis Thompson 300-1
Aaron Baddeley 300-1
Mark Anderson 300-1
Alex Smalley 300-1
Vaughn Taylor 300-1
Hudson Swafford 300-1
John Augenstein 300-1
Austin Cook 300-1
J.J. Spaun 300-1
Robby Shelton 300-1
Padraig Harrington 300-1
Tyler Duncan 300-1
Nick Watney 300-1
Cameron Percy 300-1

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